Transition to Mathematics and Science Teaching (T-MAST)

T-MAST is an innovative, fast track, four-semester graduate program for professionals who wish to transition into middle grade teaching that features:

  • A master's degree with embedded certificate designed for completion in 4 semesters
  • Accelerated, innovative classroom placement
  • Cohort design to promote the development of a professional community
  • One-year paid on-the-job internship
  • Active, multi-layered mentoring
  • Ongoing mentoring after graduation

Objective

To create an effective national model for inducting second-career professionals from mathematics and science fields into the education of young adolescent students through a fast-track Master of Arts (MA) degree program and innovative job-sharing experience.

Program Features

  • Express-track second-career professionals into schools
  • Research-based instructional strategies for effective mathematics or science teaching
  • One-year paid experience
  • Paid internship mentored by accomplished, practicing teacher and T-MAST faculty
  • Ongoing mentoring after coursework ends
  • Cohort group designed to promote development of a professional community
  • Fellowships for student support
  • Paid Internship: The paid internship is one of the most innovative characteristics of T-MAST and will streamline the pathway for T-MAST scholars into the classroom. The T-MAST scholars will each teach during the day and attend graduate courses during the evening hours. The knowledge and skills acquired from graduate courses at UCF will be applied to their teaching in public middle and high schools

 

T-MAST Scholars will be provided with extensive, multi-layered mentoring while participating in the paid-internship. Moreover, mentoring will be extended to the first year after graduation. Each T-MAST Scholar will be assigned a carefully chosen, accomplished teacher to serve as a mentor at their school. The mentors will hold a certificate for the 6-12 mathematics or science education and will advise the T-MAST Scholars on classroom strategies, paperwork, lesson plans, and interactions with administration and parents.

 

Mentors will conduct formal observations and model lessons that reflect effective instructional techniques. In addition, they will arrange for T-MAST Scholars to observe other accomplished teachers in their content area.

 

The T-MAST scholars will also have a university based mentor. The university based mentor will meet with the T-MAST scholars at their schools and at the University of Central Florida. University based mentors will observe lessons, give feedback, and support the T-MAST scholars in various ways. The mentoring is multi-layered and extends into the first year after graduation. In order to participate in the paid-internship, T-MAST students must meet all Orange County Public Schools hiring criteria.

Steps to Take

Contact Dr. Lisa Dieker at 407-823-6076 or e-mail lma@ucf.edu.

Dr. Dieker will check transcripts of required content courses, create a semester-by-semester course schedule for each T-MAST student and enroll students for required courses if necessary.

  • Decide on the year in which you want to participate in the paid internship.
  • Apply for Master of Arts in Teaching in either Mathematics Education or Science Education track.
  • Passing scores on General Knowledge Test (GKT).
  • Submit completed UCF graduate admissions forms.
  • Register for and take the appropriate subject area examination to match track.
  • Apply for fellowship.
  • Interview with Dr. Dieker.
  • If possible, begin to substitute teach.

The mission of Transition to Mathematics and Science Teaching is to increase the number of qualified middle school mathematics and science teachers by preparing professionals with a mathematics or science background to:

 

  • Enter the teaching profession through a mentoring relationship and completion of a master's degree.
  • Learn the art and science of teaching from academic and on-the-job perspectives.
  • Share professional/life experiences so that young adolescents can be prepared for advanced levels of mathematics and science.