Recent Graduates

2018-2019

Ahmad Khanijahani, Ph.D.

Track: Health Services Management & Research PhD
Dissertation: Factors Influencing Unmet Medical Need among U.S. Adults: Disparities in Access to Health Services

Hoda Fotovvat, Ph.D.

Track: Health Services Management & Research PhD
Dissertation: Predictors of hospital efficiency and quality

Vickie Carnegie, Ph.D.

Track: Public Administration PhD
Dissertation: Government Responsiveness in Matters of Racial Sensitivity

Michelle Vance, Ph.D.

Track: Social Work PhD
Dissertation: An Examination of the Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care Coordination Program for Racial and Ethnic Minority Females

Lisa Macri, Ph.D.

Track: Social Work PhD
Dissertation: Assessing Institutional Response to Sexual Violence on College Campuses: The Relationship Between Organizational Characteristics and Adherence to National Guidelines

Jesse Helligso, Ph.D.

Track: Governance & Policy Research PhD
Dissertation: Constructing and Validating an Integrative Economic Model of Health Care Systems and Health Care Markets: A Comparative Analysis of OECD Countries

Amanda Walden, Ph.D.

Track: Health Services Management & Research PhD
Dissertation: Risk in Privacy Breach Determination: The Application of Prospect Theory to Healthcare Privacy Officers

Atalie Ashley West, Ph.D.

Track: Health Services Management & Research PhD
Dissertation: Interaction Between Income, Health Insurance, and Self-rated Health: A Path Analysis.

Daniel Stephens, Ph.D.

Dissertation: Effects of Electronic Media Messages on the Perceived Self-Efficacy of Pedestrian Commuters Living in the Unincorporated Central Florida Community of Conway

Sarah Stoeckel, Ph.D.

Track: Public Administration PhD
Dissertation: Social Media Usage by Municipal Elected Officials for Open Government Community Engagement

Brittany “Brie” Haupt, Ph.D.

Visiting Instructor
School of Public Administration
Florida Atlantic University

The faculty and staff of the UCF Public Affairs program were the defining contribution to my personal, professional, and educational growth. Without specific faculty and staff members providing critical mentorship, in terms of being successful as an academic and a practitioner, I would be without a critical support network for today's public service role and responsibilities. I cannot thank these individuals enough and I try to pay it forward through mentoring students and providing support to my fellow colleagues.

Dissertation: The Use of Crisis Communication Strategies to Build Community Resilience: Evidence from Emergency Managers

2017

Tina Yeung, Ph.D.

Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Health Services Administration
College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Florida International University
Miami, Florida

The Ph.D. Public Affairs program adequately equipped me with a diverse skillset that I use in my current position to conduct research and to identify research opportunities in my current university. Through collaborative efforts with my colleagues, the impact of my research is to change current healthcare policies to minimize healthcare disparities across different population groups. Lastly, the mentorship I received in the program has been invaluable in my career development, as a professor and researcher. I make a conscious effort to mentor and provide guidance to all of my students.

Dissertation: Local Health Department Adoption of Health Information Technology and the Impact on Population Health

 

2015

Yara Asi, Ph.D.

Lecturer
Department of Health Management and Informatics
College of Community Innovation and Education
University of Central Florida

My research is very interdisciplinary, and the process of going through the Public Affairs program taught me how to approach research from other disciplines in the social sciences. Although my focus was the Health Services Management and Research track, touching on the theories, perspectives, seminal works, and arguments from social work, public administration, governance, and criminal justice helped inform how I approach research projects today. I feel as though I am a more well-rounded scholar because I did not focus only on public health or global health in my studies, and I feel more confident in collaborating with colleagues with vastly different research streams than my own because I am more easily able to find the common thread between our work.

Dissertation: Is Conflict a Factor in a Population’s Quality of Life? A Comparative Study in the Palestinian Territories and Jordan